DONATE
Sightsavers blog

Global goals: the most important thing in the world?

Sightsavers, September 2015

Some children playing

This September, world leaders are meeting in New York at the UN General Assembly to set global goals for the next 15 years.

But in all their talk of sustainable goals, global development, targets and poverty, it’s important that they remember one thing: this is about people.

People who stand to gain – or lose – an awful lot, depending on whether politicians agree to make their inclusion a priority.

Over the next couple of weeks we’ll be sharing images and quotes from people with disabilities in developing countries who’ve been empowered to transform their lives – and others who still feel trapped, isolated and invisible. Will you help us show as many people as possible why we should demand inclusion for all people, by sharing the stories on Facebook and Twitter?

We’re starting with Anuradha (below), whose story is a brilliant example of how inclusion can take someone from a life of stifled potential to one of fulfilment and participation.

It’s time for our leaders to commit to a fairer, more inclusive world. Let’s make sure that when they meet in New York, the people who hold the most power remember those who currently hold the least power, and do something about that inequality.

Anuradha quoted saying "Earlier, I would just lie down and cry a lot. But now, I am not like that. I am very confident and I take care of my family."

Anuradha

At the age of one Anuradha fell into a fire, burning her face and hands. She was stressed, lacking in confidence and unhappy until she became involved with her local disabled people’s organisation… read and share Anuradha’s story

Bhagirath quoted saying "Those born with a disability are considered a burden. Some say they should just be left to die. I want to help them"

Read Bhagirath’s story

Want to read more about our work?

Sightsavers and disability rights
Nanny Powers stands in the street holding her voting card.
Sightsavers blog

A battle to reach the ballot box: Cameroon’s growing disability movement

As Cameroon prepares for its general election, Sightsavers Country Director Joseph Oye explains why he hopes more people with disabilities will vote.

Joseph Oye, October 2018
Nine year old Sonali smiles to camera
Sightsavers blog

We’re making huge progress on avoidable blindness, but we still have work to do

Sightsavers’ Charity Dandak reflects on our achievements through the Seeing is Believing programme, and highlights the challenges we still face to tackle avoidable blindness.

Charity Dandak, October 2018
Two smiling children from the Yendi district in Ghana wave their hands in the air.
Sightsavers blog

What we’ve learned from trachoma elimination in Ghana

Sarah Bartlett discusses Sightsavers’ involvement in this milestone, what we’ve learned from the experience and the work that lies ahead.

Sarah Bartlett, September 2018