Sightsavers global

Talla

Home of our global advocacy and policy centre, detailed information on our programme work and library of professional resources.

Visit site

Health

Good health allows children to learn and adults to earn. It helps people escape from poverty and provides the basis for long term economic development. It is a basic human right, to which everyone is entitled.

There is growing evidence to suggest that people with disabilities experience poorer levels of health than their peers. Often this is related to co-morbidity linked to specific impairments, but more commonly it’s due to a lack of accessible health facilities and information as well as barriers to treatment* or discrimination. People living with disabilities frequently lack a voice in decisions about their own health as well as in the development of national health policies that affect them.

People who are visually impaired or blind make up a significant proportion of people with disabilities. Globally 39 million are blind and a further 246 million have poor vision that impairs their daily lives. Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), including onchocerciasis (river blindness) and trachoma, affect 1.4 billion of the world’s poorest people. NTDs are most common in those communities that lack access to adequate water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services.

If we want to improve people’s health and wellbeing and enable people and their families to live healthier and more socially inclusive and productive lives, we need to have the right health systems in place.

*WHO (2011) World Report on Disability Geneva, World Health Organization in:  Disability in the post-2015 framework. Lorraine Wapling, November 2012.

Stories

A woman looking at the camera.

Stigma, support and self help

Bhanvari

Untitled-2

One of a million miracles

Amina

A woman smiling.

“I see a day when we can fight for our rights”

Anuradha

A woman smiling.

'This was my chance'

Agnes

Our health-focused research is guided by our eye health strategy and fast track initiatives for eliminating river blindness and trachoma. Sightsavers’ health research falls into three main categories:

    • Measuring the distribution of visual impairment and ocular morbidity, and the associated risks. We carry out population-based surveys to determine the prevalence and distribution of blinding and non-blinding morbidity in the communities in which we work. This knowledge is key to advocating for and planning service provision. We also undertake longitudinal cohort studies that, by following individuals over a number of years, allow us to examine the determinants of eye disease.
    • Evaluating the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and acceptability of eye health interventions. We undertake studies into interventions to address ocular morbidities. This work also includes mixed-method designs combining qualitative and quantitative approaches.
    • Eye health systems research with a focus on health system strengthening and integration of care. We conduct research exploring the strengths and weaknesses of national eye health and neglected tropical disease (NTD) systems and identifying where links to broader health systems can be made. We study the factors determining supply and demand for health care services, and carry out research into the impact of integration of eye care and NTD interventions to other health services, and to wider national and local health systems.

Stories

A woman looking at the camera.

Stigma, support and self help

Bhanvari

Untitled-2

One of a million miracles

Amina

A woman smiling.

“I see a day when we can fight for our rights”

Anuradha

A woman smiling.

'This was my chance'

Agnes

Sightsavers’ projects range from innovative pilots to long term programmes, covering health, education and social inclusion. We work collaboratively with communities, local partners and governments – below are a few examples of work we’re leading on or involved with.

Our Projects

A patient being examined by a trachoma volunteer.

The Global Trachoma Mapping Project

The Global Trachoma Mapping Project was a groundbreaking three-year disease-mapping project that demonstrated that 100 million people are at risk of blindness from trachoma. The Global Trachoma Mapping Project (GTMP), ran from December 2012 – January 2016 and saw surveyors collect and transmit data from 2.6 million people in 29 countries using Android smartphones. more >

3 Elderly females in sunglasses sitting against a wall.

CATCH programme

The CATCH programme reaches out to people living in remote communities can access treatment for a range of eye conditions. The project is currently running in Malawi, Mozambique, Kenya, Uganda and Zambia. more >

Young smiling woman with some slight facial scarring

Inclusive eye health

At Sightsavers we define inclusive eye health as: “Eye health services
that are provided within a barrier free environment, which are
inclusive by design and are sustainable.” more >

Simeon Momoh, Mectizan distributer.

River blindess and lymphatic filariasis

The programme will aim to reduce cases of both of these conditions across four countries: Democratic Republic of Congo, Guinea Bissau, Nigeria and Uganda more >

© 2016 Sightsavers. Registered charity numbers 207544 and SC038110 Accessibility       Terms and conditions      Privacy and cookies