DONATE

How does the UN disability committee election work?

Ross Gilligan, November 2020
The main debating chamber at the United Nations.

The news is still full of coverage about a certain election in the US earlier this month, but another important election is taking place later in November that will have huge implications for the rights of people with disabilities across the world.

On 30 November, nine new members will be elected to the 18-strong committee that oversees the implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Every two years, half of this committee is up for election to serve for a four-year term. Not unlike that other election, an incumbent member can only be re-elected once. Here’s a brief guide to the CRPD election process.

Where does the election take place?

The election takes place at the Conference of States Parties to the CRPD, held at the UN headquarters in New York. The conference is the gathering of countries that have signed and/or ratified (made legally binding) the Convention.

Who is standing?

The candidates can be nominated by any member country that has both signed and ratified the CRPD.  This year, 28 candidates have been nominated – 13 men and 15 women – with a range of different backgrounds and experiences. Each candidate’s information and election pitch can be viewed on the CRPD election website.

How does voting work?

Each country may vote for as many or few candidates as they wish to fill the nine vacant places. The vote is a secret ballot and once all countries have completed their ballot papers, the UN secretariat will call out the name of each country in alphabetical order for a representative to cast them.

How are successful candidates elected?

To be elected, a candidate needs to obtain both the largest number of votes and an absolute majority of votes from representatives of the countries present and voting. So for example, if all 182 eligible countries are present and vote, a candidate needs to ensure that their number of votes is within the top nine of the total and higher than 91.

What happens if there are not enough candidates with a majority to fill all the positions?

If not enough candidates are elected to fill all vacant positions on the committee, additional rounds of voting following the process above will occur until all nine positions are filled.

When do elected candidates begin work on the committee?

The mandates of the nine committee members whose places are up for election expire on 31 December 2020, so the newly elected members’ work on the Committee won’t begin until 2021.

Find out more about the UN disability committee election

Join our campaign

Our Equal World campaign fights for the rights of people with disabilities.

More on the campaign

Author


Sightsavers logo

Ross Gilligan

Ross is Sightsavers’ multilateral adviser, based in Edinburgh.
Twitter

Read about Sightsavers’ commitment to inclusion

Social Inclusion Working Group
An older man talks to a younger man, who is holding a tablet computer. They are sitting in a hospital waiting room.
Sightsavers blog

Data Values campaign: why we must act now to create a fair data future

Sightsavers' Tichafara Chisaka explains how the campaign aims to transform data in the development community and why it closely aligns with our inclusion work.

Tichafara Chisaka, September 2022
Queen Elizabeth's coffin is driven in a black hearse covered in flowers, flanked by Queens Guards wearing bearskins and full red military uniforms, plus officials in dark suits.
Sightsavers blog
Blogs /

“A day I’ll remember all my life”: observations from the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II

“I was at the funeral to represent Sightsavers to honour our departed patron, on behalf of the people we serve, the supporters who make this possible and all our staff across the world.”

Caroline Harper, September 2022
Nora teaches numbers to pre-school children. A child using a wheelchair sits on her left.
Sightsavers blog

Transforming Education Summit: our call for world leaders

Sightsavers’ inclusive education policy officer Takyiwa Danso explains why we’re calling on global leaders to protect the rights of children with disabilities.

Takyiwa Danso, September 2022