DONATE

Guinea

Sightsavers’ work in Guinea focuses on preventing the spread of neglected tropical diseases. In 2017 we helped to distribute almost 2.5 million NTD treatments and supported 1,900 sight-saving operations.

Our work in Guinea

It is estimated more than 6.7 million people require preventative treatment for river blindness, a neglected tropical disease (NTD) that is endemic in Guinea. However, the country has a severe lack of eye care resources.

To tackle NTDs in the country, Sightsavers is helping to train doctors, nurses and village distributors to administer medication that can prevent river blindness spreading and stop patients suffering further sight loss. We are also implementing the SAFE strategy, a public health approach endorsed by the World Health Organization that aims to control the spread of trachoma. The project aims to prevent blindness, reduce poverty and improve quality of life and socio-economic development in affected communities.

Schistosomiasis and intestinal worms are also endemic in the country. As part of a push to eliminate the diseases, we distribute de-worming medication to schoolchildren that are at risk, support education programmes, and train teachers and volunteers to distribute medication.

Sightsavers is working to improve Guinea’s healthcare system by helping to train ophthalmologists and bringing in trained health workers from other West African countries, such as Togo, Niger, Mali and Benin. We also provide surgical equipment and support cataract operations.

Dicko Boubacar Morou.

Meet our Guinea Country Director

Dicko has worked for Sightsavers for more than nine years. He says: “The best part of my job is giving visually impaired children access to education and ensuring future generations never go blind from trachoma and river blindness.”

Mamadou wears maroon robe with a white cap and his daughter Rougiatou Bah wears a leopard print headscarf. Mamadou is holding his daughter in his arms.

How we’re making a difference

Rivers are the most high-risk location for contracting river blindness because the disease is transmitted by black flies, which breed near fast-flowing water. Luckily for farmer Mamdou, who lives close to a river in Guinea, access to medication saved him from losing his sight completely. Read Mamadou’s story.

Your donation could help to protect sight

DONATE

More about our work

An eye care worker holding a notepad with a phone resting on top.
Sightsavers blog
Blogs / NTDs /

What it means to work in a team gathering data to eliminate trachoma

Sightsavers’ Cristina Jimenez shares her thoughts on the pioneering Tropical Data project, which helps to identify where trachoma treatment is needed.

sightsavers_news
News / NTDs /

Celebrations held in Ghana to mark trachoma elimination

Government leaders, health workers, volunteers and international aid workers have gathered in Ghana’s capital, Accra, to mark the achievement.

Two women have their eyes examined while walking in the field with their crops.
Sightsavers from the field

The final days of trachoma in Ghana

Sightsavers’ Kate McCoy followed a team of eye care workers as they raced through cities and villages to find any remaining patients: they needed to treat them all to eliminate the disease for good.

We save sight in 30 countries worldwide

Where we work