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Connecting the Dots

Our Connecting the Dots training and employment programme has transformed the lives of young people with disabilities in western Uganda.

A young woman working at a sewing machine.

During the initial four year-project, Connecting the Dots has delivered vocational training, transformed attitudes to disability and strengthened the work of organisations working with people with disabilities.

The project has provided vocational training for more than 300 young people with disabilities, and changed attitudes to disability by showing that people with disabilities can be valued, productive employees.

Find out more by reading our learning report, which focuses on what we’ve learned about changing attitudes, norms and behaviours within the project.

Two follow-up projects are building on the success of Connecting the Dots by increasing the number of participants and expanding to other areas of the country. You can also read an evaluation of these projects.

324
young people graduated from the initial four-year project
98%
of them were earning an income after graduating
250
students enrolled in the follow-up project

The European Commission has funded the economic empowerment programme since 2012, and additional funding was awarded in August 2017 by the National Lottery Community Fund. This generous support has helped to transform the lives of hundreds of young people with disabilities in Uganda.

Stories

Charles Ahumuza at work as an engineer.

Charles's story

“I grew up wanting to be an electrician, so nothing could divert me from my chosen career. I get good feedback from my customers.”
Read Charles’s story

A group of people sitting on the grass. A man, with a money box, is leading a discussion.

Masindi Savings and Loan

The group meets under a tree outside local council buildings in Uganda. But the unusual location isn’t the only unorthodox thing about it.
Read the story

Edith smiles as she stands holding her young son.

Edith’s story

“Here in Uganda the attitude was negative. People with disabilities were often nicknamed ‘kateyemba’, which means ‘the unable one’”.
Read Edith’s story

I wanted to show the community that disabled people can also be productive.
Simon Peter, knitting graduate/teacher
Simon Peter Otoyo with one of his graduating students at Amor Foundation Vocational Training School in Bweyale, Uganda.

More from Connecting the Dots

Edith with Atugonza, one of the graduates of the Connecting the Dots programme.
Sightsavers blog

Why tackling disability discrimination is key to employment projects

As part of our Connecting the Dots project in Uganda, we tested a new way of boosting employment rates by influencing communities, families and businesses to act more positively toward people with disabilities.

Edith Kagoya, June 2021
Isaac sits outside his mechanics.
Sightsavers from the field

The business owner training young people with disabilities

Isaac Bolingo is training young people with disabilities to be mechanics in his garage.

September 2020
A girl with deafblindness plays with her siblings.
Sightsavers from the field

“As a parent, to see your child happy, is as much as you can ask for.”

Sightsavers and Sense International supported 14-year-old Hellen and her family from Masindi, Uganda, by helping them communicate with each other and support themselves financially.

April 2020