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Benin

Our work in Benin focuses on treating and preventing neglected tropical diseases. In 2018 we helped to distribute 5.7 million treatments for debilitating diseases in the country.

Two men measure the height of a women in order to give her the correct dosage of medicine.

Sightsavers is working to protect more than 3.9 million people in Benin from avoidable blindness by eliminating onchocerciasis, otherwise known as river blindness.

This debilitating disease, caused by parasite infections, is spread via the bite of infected black flies, and can lead to blindness. It is thought to be endemic in 51 of Benin’s 77 districts.

As well as treating river blindness, we also provide medication to tackle lymphatic filariasis, another neglected tropical disease that causes severe disfigurement.

In 2018, Sightsavers provided more than 5.7 million treatments in Benin to help protect against both diseases. We also helped to train more than 19,000 volunteer community distributors in Benin, enabling them to gather data and give out medication to protect against these diseases.

At a glance

Total population
  • 11 million

  • What we focus on
  • River blindness
  • Lymphatic filariasis

  • Key programmes
  • Reducing river blindness
  • A billion NTD treatments
  • Trachoma Mapping Project

  • The best part of my job is ensuring future generations never lose their sight from diseases such as river blindness.
    Dicko Boubacar, Benin Country Director
    Dicko Boubacar Morou.
    Staff members cross the bridge.

    How we’re making a difference in Benin

    Many areas of the country are inaccessible by road, so our eye care workers travel many miles on foot to distribute sight-saving medication to the people who need it.

    Read about their journey

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