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Kenya

Kenya’s leading cause of sight loss is cataracts, while diseases such as trachoma also play a part. Our work in the country focuses on improving eye care and preventing eye disease.

A girl carries water she collected in Turkana, northern Kenya.

When Sightsavers started working in Kenya in 1952, our focus was to eliminate avoidable blindness and provide rehabilitation for adults who were irreversibly blind.

Today, we’re continuing this work by improving local health services, training doctors and eye surgeons, and making sure eye care is available for everyone.

We’re also working to eliminate several neglected tropical diseases in Kenya: we distribute medication to help control the spread of blinding trachoma, and educate local communities about the importance of hygiene and cleanliness to prevent diseases spreading.

Finally, our inclusive education programmes in Kenya aim to make sure children with disabilities are able to go to school. We raise awareness in communities about disability rights, and train teachers so they have the specialist skills needed to teach children with disabilities.

At a glance

Total population
  • 48 million

  • What we focus on
  • Cataracts
  • Trachoma
  • Disability rights

  • Key programmes
  • Cataract surgery
  • Inclusive education
  • CATCH: coordinated health
  • Super School of 5
  • I worried I would go completely blind. But after my surgery, I can see! I’m full of joy and I’m so grateful to everyone.
    Simburia, cataract patient
    Sumburia.

    How we’re making a difference in Kenya

    Boy is held by his mother, he has a face washing guide in his hand.

    Raising awareness

    Our Super School of 5 project, in northern Kenya, features superhero characters to encourage children to wash their hands and faces.
    Read about the project

    Flash sits at his desk in a wheelchair in school, surrounded by his classmates as they listen to their teacher.

    Inclusive education

    Flash Odiwuor, a 13-year-old from Kenya, caught polio and lost the use of his legs. But a Sightsavers project enabled him to return to school.
    Read Flash’s story

    Smiling girl from Uganda

    Protecting sight

    We train eye health workers and help to improve local healthcare services in Kenya to make sure no one goes blind from avoidable causes.
    Read about our work

    Your donation could help to protect sight

    DONATE

    More from Kenya

    A group of patients in Kenya smile and laugh following their cataract surgery.
    Sightsavers from the field

    October updates: highlights from around the world

    In October, celebrations took place in many of Sightsavers' programme countries to mark World Sight Day. Plus news from Kenya, Mozambique and more.

    Felix in a white coat sitting behind some ophthalmology equipment.
    Sightsavers from the field

    September highlights: updates from around the world

    News from Zambia, where Sightsavers helped Felix to gain his ophthalmology diploma. Plus news from Guinea, Togo and more.

    A woman in Tanzania splashes water on her face from a metal bucket.
    Sightsavers from the field

    How water is vital to fight trachoma

    To mark World Water Week 2018, Sightsavers’ NTD Programme Officer Cade Howard shares tips from the field about how water can help to eliminate this painful, blinding disease.

    Hula wears her new glasses and reads from a sheet of paper.
    Sightsavers from the field

    August highlights: updates from around the world

    The latest from Kenya, where Sightsavers staff have been carrying out eye screenings in a refugee camp in Turkana. Plus news from India and Nigeria.

    A lady smiling outside a centre in Malawi which provides physiotherapy.
    sightsavers_news

    More UK funding announced for disability-inclusive employment initiatives

    The funding, which was announced by UK Secretary of State Penny Mordaunt, aims to address disability inclusion in developing countries.

    Anwar, who has a prosthetic leg, running alongside other people with disabilities.
    Sightsavers from the field

    June highlights: updates from around the world

    A round-up of the latest work that your donations help to support. Featuring news from India, Kenya, Senegal, Uganda and Nigeria.

    Sumburia.
    Sightsavers from the field

    January highlights: updates from around the world

    A round-up from the field, including news from the CATCH programme in Uganda and Kenya, plus updates from India and Burkina Faso.

    People line up along a jetty in the Subdarbans in southern India.
    Sightsavers from the field

    December highlights: updates from around the world

    A round-up from the field, including news from India, where a book has been published to highlight Sightsavers’ work in the coastal Sundarbans region.

    Fynn meets programme staff during his trip.
    Sightsavers from the field

    Good eye health services are vital, whether you live in Cardiff or Kenya

    In summer 2017, 16-year-old Fynn Helyar travelled to Samburu County in Kenya to see eye examinations, diagnoses and surgery. Here is his story.

    Louise Robinson greeting people
    sightsavers_news

    Senior DFID advisor visits eye camps in Samburu County, Kenya

    Louise Robinson has visited projects as part of The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust Trachoma Initiative and Sightsavers’ CATCH project.

    Flash sits at his desk in a wheelchair in school, surrounded by his classmates as they listen to their teacher.
    Sightsavers Reports

    Flash’s story

    Flash Odiwuor, a 13-year-old from Kenya, contracted polio and lost the use of his legs. But a Sightsavers programme enabled him to return to school.

    A group of villagers sit on the grass while waiting to be screened for eye conditions at a health centre in Uganda.
    Sightsavers blog

    Eye health: the community approach

    The CATCH programme aims to ensure that people in trachoma-endemic areas benefit from improved health through the provision of eye care services.

    We save sight in 30 countries worldwide

    Where we work