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Zimbabwe

Our work in Zimbabwe includes examining people for eye conditions, as well as helping to carry out sight-saving cataract operations.

A group of children standing, some have their arms over other children.

Untreated cataracts are a major cause of blindness in Zimbabwe, and eye diseases such as trachoma are endemic in many areas of the country.

Sightsavers first started working in Zimbabwe in the 1950s: we were the founding member of Zimbabwe Council for the Blind, thanks to Sightsavers founder Sir John Wilson. Today, we aim to reduce avoidable blindness in the country by carrying out cataract operations and helping people to access essential eye health services. We help to train ophthalmic nurses, ophthalmologists and health staff, and provide medical equipment to improve the quality of eye surgery in district hospitals.

Sightsavers’ work in Zimbabwe is aligned with the UN’s Global Goals, a set of targets to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all. To monitor progress towards the goals, governments are encouraged to undertake a voluntary national review: in the video below, Sightsavers Zimbabwe programme manager Peter Bare speaks about our involvement in the national review process.

At a glance

Total population
  • 16.1 million

  • What we focus on
  • Cataracts
  • Trachoma

    Key programmes
  • Cataract surgery
  • Trachoma Mapping Project

  • Your donation could help to protect sight

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    More from eastern Africa

    A woman has her eyes examined by a health worker, who shines a torch into her eye.
    Sightsavers Reports

    Namakau’s story

    Namakau, from Zambia, has had trachoma for decades and is now irreversibly blind. A fear of modern medicine had stopped her from seeking treatment.

    A village screening by Dr Ndalela under a tree.
    Sightsavers from the field

    Sightsavers in Zambia: protecting rural communities from trachoma

    Sightsavers’ Tom Hodgson travelled to Zambia to see how eye surgeon Mr Ndalela is saving sight by diagnosing and treating people for trachoma.

    Two medical staff clean eyes of men in traditional african dress.
    Sightsavers from the field

    November updates: highlights from around the world

    News about a programme that has distributed more than 137,000 pairs of glasses across eight countries. Plus updates from Guinea, Cote d’Ivoire, Mozambique and more.

    Mwiza looks sad as he sits outside his home.
    Sightsavers Reports

    Mwiza’s story

    Mwiza, like many eight-year-olds, loves soccer and playing with his best friend. But he has trachoma: without treatment, he risks losing his sight.

    Villagers gather round to have their eyes checked.
    Sightsavers from the field

    Saving sight in Zambia’s most remote regions

    Sightsavers’ Caitlin Maslen travelled with an outreach team as they visited an isolated village to treat people with trachoma.

    A group of patients in Kenya smile and laugh following their cataract surgery.
    Sightsavers from the field

    October updates: highlights from around the world

    In October, celebrations took place in many of Sightsavers' programme countries to mark World Sight Day. Plus news from Kenya, Mozambique and more.

    A man smiles, wearing a yellow Sightsavers tshirt.
    Sightsavers Reports

    Givemore’s story

    Ophthalmic nurse Givemore travels to remote communities in Zimbabwe to examine people for signs of trachoma. He wants to make sure everyone is treated so their sight can be saved.

    Augusto and his grandchildren smile and wave at the camera.
    Sightsavers Reports

    Augusto’s story

    Augusto, who had both cataracts and trachoma, struggled to get medical help because of his disability. But Sightsavers’ inclusive healthcare approach enabled him to be treated.

    Felix in a white coat sitting behind some ophthalmology equipment.
    Sightsavers from the field

    September highlights: updates from around the world

    News from Zambia, where Sightsavers helped Felix to gain his ophthalmology diploma. Plus news from Guinea, Togo and more.

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