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Zimbabwe

Our work in Zimbabwe includes examining people for eye conditions, as well as helping to carry out sight-saving cataract operations.

A group of children standing, some have their arms over other children.

Untreated cataracts are a major cause of blindness in Zimbabwe, and eye diseases such as trachoma are endemic in many areas of the country.

Sightsavers first started working in Zimbabwe in the 1950s: we were the founding member of Zimbabwe Council for the Blind, thanks to Sightsavers founder Sir John Wilson. Today, we aim to reduce avoidable blindness in the country by carrying out cataract operations and helping people to access essential eye health services. We help to train ophthalmic nurses, ophthalmologists and health staff, and provide medical equipment to improve the quality of eye surgery in district hospitals.

Sightsavers’ work in Zimbabwe is aligned with the UN’s Global Goals, a set of targets to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure prosperity for all. To monitor progress towards the goals, governments are encouraged to undertake a voluntary national review: in the video below, Sightsavers Zimbabwe programme manager Peter Bare speaks about our involvement in the national review process.

At a glance

Total population
  • 16.1 million

  • What we focus on
  • Cataracts
  • Trachoma

    Key programmes
  • Cataract surgery
  • Trachoma Mapping Project

  • Your donation could help to protect sight

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